About Blue Lily Retreat

In summer, Blue Lily Retreat is surrounded by abundant Agapanthus, also known as the blue lily.  Guests can enjoy the peaceful farm house and farm cottage suited for individuals, couples, families or a small group of friends.

You can experience Klein Karoo Country Life on a working farm.  For those who like to explore the Klein Karoo, exciting venues in the area can be discovered.

Blue Lily Retreat is also a retreat destination for individual unstructured retreats, retreats for individual or family recovery from unsettling life events or trauma or structured group retreats with specific themes.

The name Agapanthus comes from the Greek Words Agapè (love) and Anthos (flower), therefore literally meaning “flower of love”. 

Locally it is often referred to as blue lily, isicakathi (Xhosa) and ubani (Zulu), while in Europe and America it is popularly known as the African lily.

The Agapanthus is used in many traditional rituals and remedies in Southern Africa. Xhosa women make a necklace from the roots of the plant to ensure healthy, strong babies. The Zulu use the plant to treat heart disease and paralysis and it is said to revive the tired and swollen feet of hikers who wrap their feet in the leaves for half an hour. In fact, scientific studies have revealed that Agapanthus does contain several chemical compounds with anti-inflammatory properties.

Agapaeo means:

love of person:
to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly.

love of things:
to be well pleased, to be contented at or with a thing

Agapanthus are endemic (occurring naturally only) to Southern Africa. They occur where rainfall exceeds 500mm per year, from sea-level to 2000 meters, from the Cape Peninsula in the South West, along the southern and eastern coast of Southern Africa, then inland and northwards into the mountainous regions south of the Limpopo River.

The Agapanthus is undoubtedly one of our indigenous botanical treasures. It has been exported to all corners of the earth, but occurs naturally only in Southern Africa, where it grows in the wild in all our provinces, except the Northern Cape, as well as in Lesotho, Swaziland and Mozambique.